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    April 30, 2012 | 2:14 PM

    Quebecers hear the call and rise up for the environment

    Montreal held the largest environmental demonstration in the history of Canada on Sunday, April 22. At 2 p.m., bells rang in 1200 churches across the province. In downtown Montreal, people gathered and you could not see the end of this massive human wave. Apparently, there were so many people that the Metro system could not handle the traffic and some people could not even make it to the demonstration!
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    April 26, 2012 | 10:00 PM

    Summer gas prices: Here's the reality

    So what can we do about this? Big oil and its supporters have the same answer they always have: Drill even more. Worse yet, they are now using dangerous and unconventional forms of drilling that are even more carbon pollution-intensive, like dirty tar sands oil. And the more we drill, the more we continue our dependence on oil -- and you pay for this dependence every time you fill up the gas tank.
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    April 25, 2012 | 9:38 AM

    The Island President stands up for a global problem

    What would you do if you lived on an island 1.5 meters above sea level and faced the dangers of climate change? A new film shows how in the island nation of the Maldives, one brave leader is helping make climate change a global human rights issue.
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    April 20, 2012 | 1:12 PM

    Will Donald Trump "Save" Scotland from Wind Power?

    Trump's reaction to an offshore wind farm within view of his investment might say something about the way "the Donald" conducts his business, but it's also symbolic of where the renewables debate currently lies.
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    April 20, 2012 | 9:03 AM

    Oyster-lovers beware ... this delicacy could become a rarity

    As an ardent foodie, I was concerned to see the results of a new study last week. The study warns that oyster production may decline due to rising carbon dioxide levels. Researchers found that higher levels of carbon dioxide in ocean water made the water more acidic and reduced the ability of oyster larvae to develop shells. This impaired the ability of oysters to grow at a normal pace, and led to a decline in yield.
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    April 18, 2012 | 1:43 PM

    Is climate change really controversial?

    A new poll was released today which, according the New York Times, "shows that a large majority of Americans believe that this year's unusually warm winter, last year's blistering summer and some other weather disasters were probably made worse by global warming."
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    April 13, 2012 | 1:01 PM

    Teens sue the government for violating its public trust duties

    Last week, a group of young citizens sat in Courtroom 17 before the federal District Court in Washington, D.C. They were there for a hearing in a lawsuit commenced in May 2011 by Alec Loorz, one of our own Climate Presenters; four other teens from California and Virginia; and two environmental nonprofit organizations. What do they want out of this lawsuit? To hold the U.S. government accountable for preserving the atmospheric public trust.
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    April 12, 2012 | 9:40 AM

    Early spring not so sweet for sugar maples

    Will warm springs and late frosts mean the end of sugar maples? No. But the scientists also found that yellow birch and American beech trees – which are slower to leaf out than sugar maples, even when temperatures are high – aren't as sensitive to frost. Meaning that as spring comes earlier in the year because of climate change, birch and beech may replace sugar maples in some locations.
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    April 10, 2012 | 12:59 PM

    March 2012: The warmest March since 1895

    In many ways it's been a beautiful spring, but something about it just hasn't been right. The cherry blossoms here in D.C. bloomed early, the bright pinks and reds of the azaleas at the Masters were missing, and it seems like allergy season is taking on a whole new meaning.
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    April 10, 2012 | 9:47 AM

    Fewer cows and a shortage of flowers: How climate change impacts the Maasai in Kenya

    We visited a community of Maasai who are already suffering from impacts of climate change as droughts have become more frequent and severe. Normally the short rainy season occurs from late October through November, and the long rains go from March through June. We arrived just after the long rains had started. Even so, the local papers were again warning that there will be food shortages because of drier conditions.
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